Peter Benei

Top 3 Digital Analytics Trends To Watch Out For In 2017

top-3-digital-analytics-trends-to-watch-out-for-in-2017

Marketing automation, audience segmentation and personalisation are the biggest trends to watch out for in the digital marketing sphere in the coming 2017.

In 2015, digital marketing tools evolved to a stage where literally everyone who has some basic knowledge in digital marketing can kick-start a campaign with the latest and most advanced digital tools. Building a website or a landing page is now as easy as creating a social media profile. Implementing analytics systems doesn’t require a developer and every marketer, aware that there is so much noise on the internet, knows that every company should personalise their messages to reach out to the right person in their audience.

Automate to save time for more important tasks! 

In the early 2010s, digital marketing tools, like social media management services, email and newsletter providers and digital sales software went over the tipping point and went beyond the early adopters – the best professional marketers. Just last year, these tools have evolved to a simplified and sophisticated user interface; everyone can sign up and start to use them.

Tools like Hootsuite, IFTT and other management and automation services are available for the masses now. Services which were available for only the biggest companies and agencies are now not only affordable but also just as sophisticated making them accessible to use for any organisation. Companies like Pardot, HubSpot, Marketo, and Infusionsoft, are on fire not just for large organisations but for SME’s and freelance marketers as well.

This is a result of good user experience planning and the increasing demand for these services. Marketing Automation is a great timesaver and can lead to significantly better results when planned and implemented correctly across an organisation.

Segment your audiences to increase your sales impact! 

Segment your audiences to increase your sales impact! The same pattern happened with digital analytics in the early 2010s. All-rounder analytics services were made available, and free products like Google Analytics brought plenty of value for marketers. Paid tools like ChartBeat and Omniture with solid insights were also affordable. With the boom on big data in the past few years, the data gathered from digital channels began to become useful.

To remain competitive, leading organisations have learnt how to capture, analyse, and leverage this data in their business decision making every day. Segmentation is a core skill to learn and apply to digital marketing. Segmenting your target audience and your actual buyers will help you increase sales.

The usual segmentation techniques on demography and top level site usage are not enough anymore: segmenting on the individual customer journey is a must for every website which has a reasonable amount of traffic and buyers. The new trend of attribution marketing has grown out from high-level segmentation techniques and will begin to influence trends: now you can assign values to each segment in the customer journey to maximise your sales funnels’ success on an individual basis.

Personalise your targeting to make an impact! 

Sophisticated and accessible digital analytics have grown personalisation in digital marketing. Personalisation began with adding the first name of the customer to the email introduction, or subject line. Personalisation now includes specific personalised email and website content, and prediction of what a person’s interest. A personalised email has six times more traction and revenue rate than template emails.

Targeted call-to-actions are also much more successful regarding conversion than traditional CTAs. Analytics has its part in this game but not with the top-level insights as we see in segmentation but with high valued real time data which allows marketers to personalise on-demand every aspect of the customer journey.

With the growing trends of automation, segmentation and personalisation, digital marketing consultancy has also changed. The traditional production-based client-agency relationship is becoming less relevant, and the classic consultant is the winner of the game. This helps the internal marketers who keep an eye on the real-time customer journey of the company and consults on the best use of the services and evaluates all marketing plans with the expert’s outsider view.

The Walter Analytics team is always on its toes and on the lookout for relevant trends to determine how our clients can leverage them to grow their businesses.

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Analyse Like A Pro: 6 Tips to Improve Your Google Analytics Knowledge Part 2

Google Analytics is often the most available digital analytics tool as it is free and easy-to-setup. Basics are important but how can you improve your Google Analytics knowledge?

analyse-like-a-pro-6-tips-to-improve-your-google-analytics-knowledge-2

If you are from the marketing world, you probably used or at least heard of Google Analytics as it is the most-used analytics platform nowadays. It is widely accessible, and the user experience allows even novice users to start to work on the understanding of their digital properties’ performance. In this article, we get hands on and share another three tips on how to improve your Google Analytics usage. Read our previous three tips here.

Think Mobile

Mobile is the biggest thing, hands down. In some cases, visitors coming from mobile are overtaking visitors coming from a desktop. Therefore, you want to know as much as it is possible on your mobile visitors. Google Analytics offers you mobile app analytics as well but now just focus on classic websites with probably mobile-friendly responsive design.

The classic mobile segmentation report at Audience section – Mobile part that you can get is already full of great information, get familiar with it. With some recent update, you can also check not just the exact mobile devices visitors use to view your site, but also you can look up the pictures of these devices. Not everyone is an expert on mobile, so it is a great help for you to know what that device does, what type of mobile browser works on it as well as the size of the screen. It helps you to optimise your site’s design for mobile further.

With custom reports – which we have discussed in our previous post (LINK) – you can add mobile as a primary source of visits as well. It is magical to see how your most successful content changes regarding desktop and mobile visits so don’t be shy to experiment with it.

Track the Right Way

By default, Google Analytics uses the default naming techniques on everything. So “Email” is email and so on as a referral for example. But you might have specific campaigns that you want track individually. You want to know how users responded to your email campaign for example. There are some certain things you need to be aware in this:

  • Name your campaigns properly and consistently

You don’t want to have an “Email campaign” and an “E-mail campaign” named campaign view in your dashboard. Use consistent naming and follow a campaign naming sheet with your team if you have multiple campaigns you want to track.

  • Use UTM / Custom URL

You want to know more about how one campaign performs, use a custom URL to track a particular link in your campaign. You will see the custom URL popping up in your Campaigns view in Google Analytics. That view will represent only that campaign and provides you enormous information on how that campaign affected your site’s performance.

  • Event tracking consistency

We have talked about how Google Tag Manager can help you to understand how users behave on your site, where they click and how they interact with your site in our last post (LINK!). Keep in mind; you need to name those ‘Events’ properly. You don’t want to have an “Email Signup Button” tracking if you have multiple signup options on your site, name them properly and be consistent.

Go Visual!

Google Analytics provides you excellent charts and tables of course. They are simple, straight forward and easy to generate. But what if you want to visualise something that is only a table in Google Analytics? Or maybe what if you want to make those charts prettier? You have two options.

  • Use third-party visual tools

There are many tools that you can use with Google Analytics to visualise your data. Google Data Studio is one of them, and it is free to use and works well with Analytics. There are other tools as well, like Segment but if you prefer Google-related products, Google Data Studio is highly recommended.

  • Export your data

All data in Google Analytics can be exported to simple spreadsheets. But remember, these are raw data sets. But if you are building your own reports from scratch or you need to add your raw data into a much bigger stream, exporting your tables directly from Analytics is a great option.

Bonus!

Add Supermetrics to your Google Docs, it’s free (for now). It fetches data from Google-related (and much more) platforms directly to your Google Docs. Now it also has automatized syncs, so you don’t need to export anything, this tool does it for you in a very delicate way.

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Analyse Like A Pro: 6 Tips to Improve Your Google Analytics Knowledge Part 1

Google Analytics is often the most available digital analytics tool as it is free and easy to set-up. Basics are important but how can you improve your Google Analytics knowledge? Here are the first three tips to start with!

analyse-like-a-pro-6-tips-to-improve-your-google-analytics-knowledge-part-1

If you are from the marketing industry, you probably used or at least heard of Google Analytics as it is the most-used analytics platform nowadays. It is widely accessible, and the user experience allows even novice users to start to work on the understanding of their digital properties’ performance. In this article, we get hands on and share the three tips on how to improve your Google Analytics usage.

Connect the Dots

Google Analytics works amazingly with other Google-related products. Google Analytics can be your primary analytics dashboard for basically everything digital, apart from social media monitoring. The first three services you need to setup and connect to your Analytics account are the Webmaster Tools, your AdWords account and the Google Tag Manager.

Webmaster Tools helps you to understand how your site performs. Especially it helps you to understand organic search – basically, it is useful for search engine optimisation. Webmaster Tools tell how your site is doing in terms of ranking but it can also give you fantastic info on what external users look for in search. Once you set up your site in Webmaster Tools, go to Google Analytics > Traffic Sources > Sources > Search > Organic and check for the most relevant search keywords that drive traffic to your site.

AdWords is straightforward; once you have an AdWords campaign started, just connect your campaign with Google Analytics and check how the campaign affected your website’s performance in Acquisition – Campaigns. Remember, Google Analytics tell you how your websites perform but not how your AdWords campaign performs. The current bidding, clicks and other campaign information still should be checked on your AdWords accounts.

By adding Google Tag Manager, you will see how your site performs in terms of behaviour. You still can do that in Behavior > Events by adding event after event to your code and measure the performance of, for example, a button that let others subscribe to your newsletter. Google Tag Manager does the same but with a much code-friendly user experience. It makes your life a LOT easier so don’t be afraid to set it up and connect it with Google Analytics.

Reduce the Clutter

Google Analytics works amazingly with other Google-related products. Google Analytics can be your primary analytics dashboard for basically everything digital, apart from social media monitoring. The first three services you need to setup and connect to your Analytics account are the Webmaster Tools, your AdWords account and the Google Tag Manager.

Webmaster Tools helps you to understand how your site performs. Especially it helps you to understand organic search – basically, it is useful for search engine optimisation. Webmaster Tools tell how your site is doing in terms of ranking but it can also give you fantastic info on what external users look for in search. Once you set up your site in Webmaster Tools, go to Google Analytics > Traffic Sources > Sources > Search > Organic and check for the most relevant search keywords that drive traffic to your site.

AdWords is straightforward; once you have an AdWords campaign started, just connect your campaign with Google Analytics and check how the campaign affected your website’s performance in Acquisition – Campaigns. Remember, Google Analytics tell you how your websites perform but not how your AdWords campaign performs. The current bidding, clicks and other campaign information still should be checked on your AdWords accounts.

By adding Google Tag Manager, you will see how your site performs in terms of behaviour. You still can do that in Behavior > Events by adding event after event to your code and measure the performance of, for example, a button that let others subscribe to your newsletter. Google Tag Manager does the same but with a much code-friendly user experience. It makes your life a LOT easier so don’t be afraid to set it up and connect it with Google Analytics.

Go Your Own Way

Google Analytics works amazingly with other Google-related products. Google Analytics can be your primary analytics dashboard for basically everything digital, apart from social media monitoring. The first three services you need to setup and connect to your Analytics account are the Webmaster Tools, your AdWords account and the Google Tag Manager.

Webmaster Tools helps you to understand how your site performs. Especially it helps you to understand organic search – basically, it is useful for search engine optimisation. Webmaster Tools tell how your site is doing in terms of ranking but it can also give you fantastic info on what external users look for in search. Once you set up your site in Webmaster Tools, go to Google Analytics > Traffic Sources > Sources > Search > Organic and check for the most relevant search keywords that drive traffic to your site.

AdWords is straightforward; once you have an AdWords campaign started, just connect your campaign with Google Analytics and check how the campaign affected your website’s performance in Acquisition – Campaigns. Remember, Google Analytics tell you how your websites perform but not how your AdWords campaign performs. The current bidding, clicks and other campaign information still should be checked on your AdWords accounts.

By adding Google Tag Manager, you will see how your site performs in terms of behaviour. You still can do that in Behavior > Events by adding event after event to your code and measure the performance of, for example, a button that let others subscribe to your newsletter. Google Tag Manager does the same but with a much code-friendly user experience. It makes your life a LOT easier so don’t be afraid to set it up and connect it with Google Analytics.

BONUS!

You can create a shortcut for your most frequented reporting tables. Just create your desired table view and create a shortcut for it in Google Analytics, name it, and that’s it, it’s there forever. Again, saves you a lot of time in reporting.

If you have further questions on how to use Google Analytics properly, head over to our Academy to learn more about analytics or request an on-demand QA with us to get personalised help!

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How to Measure Landing Page Performance

Landing pages are often treated like websites but they are not. Their sole goal is to convert visitors. But how do we measure their performance?

how-to-measure-landing-page-performance

Landing pages are as old as the websites on the internet. They were here way before social media became a thing and they will be here after the fall of social and open net. They are straightforward and focused on standalone goals: to capture leads. But to create an effective landing page that converts users, we need more than one metric that measures conversions. This article will help you to clear up the dust.

What is a conversion?

Before creating a landing page, the first rule should be to define the goal of the landing page’s purpose. The goal will define what we mean by conversion. Common goals for a landing page can be capturing emails, hitting downloads, spending X amount of time on site, number of pages visited or even more specific goals. Either way, almost all type of goals can be added into Google Analytics’ goal setup sequence.

The landing page’s goal is your key metric; every other metrics should support the journey to your goal.

Image of workplace with paper and electronic documents on desk

Supporting metrics

The key benefit of a landing page over a traditional website is that a landing page can be easily adjusted and tailored to the needs of the visitors. If you spot anything that doesn’t work properly or you have a very particular target group of users who are coming to your site, you can quickly adjust your landing page to support their needs. Your primary metric from now on is conversion rate, the number of users who visited your site and converted into leads. Everything else is secondary.

There are common metrics however which you need to follow to measure your landing page’s performance properly.

Visits should be the primary supporting metric. You need traffic to your website to convert leads. Without traffic, no leads. You need to watch for the overall metric as the number of visits, unique users and sessions but, and this might be more important than the stripped-down visits: what are the sources of visits. You probably do some advertising for your landing page, use unique custom URL-s to track your campaigns’ success. It is possible that the landing page has great search engine hits; you want to know the winning keywords and optimise your site from that conclusion. Sources of traffic will tell you the background of your visitors.

Bounce rate is important. High bounce rate tells you that the users who are coming to your site, leave the site immediately. Leading causes for high bounce rate:

  1. a) The lack of information or misinformation on the site
  2. b) Poor user experience design that is not appealing to your visitors
  3. c) The site is difficult to navigate, slow or anything that is connected to a bad development work

Time on page comes after bounce rate. If your users decided to stay on your site, how long do they spend on it? It is a landing page, so unusually high volumes of time are not beneficial. You need to convert users fast. If something is not clear or simple on your page, users can easily get lost and spend valuable time on your site.

Changing the perspective

Every metric you have must support the main goal: conversion. So, you need to check all your metrics from the goal’s perspective. For example, it is great to know from where you have the most traffic. Is it social media? Search engines? If social, which networks? Check the traffic sources and view them from the goal conversion rates. Maybe it tells you: most of the users from Twitter convert, but none of them from Facebook. You might want to review your Facebook strategy to reach equal numbers in social networks in terms of conversion.

Time on site and visits through the landing page also important. With multi-channel funnels and assisted conversions, you can check what it takes to convert. Some users convert on the first click on your site, and there are others who need more time to convert and more browsing on your site. You can also segment these funnels into networks so you would know, for example, users coming from Facebook are most likely to convert to your goal on the first click or within 1 minute on the site.

Harnessing the adjustability

As we’ve said, the key benefit of a landing page over a traditional website is their adjustability. If you have new insights on how users convert on your landing page, you can quickly change the structure of your page. But sometimes you have multiple ways your users convert. In this scenario, you might just need to create multiple landing pages for the same goal. Every individual user will see a different, tailored, adjusted and converting landing page.

There are many tools to use for tailored or flexible landing pages, and there are more tools to measure their performance. Head to our Academy to learn more about these tools and how to use them to create landing pages that convert users into leads!

What conversion strategies have you organised for your landing pages? 

Do you wish to discuss this further for your business? 

Connect with us and book a Q&A session today!

Influence by the Numbers: Understanding Influencer Marketing

It’s no secret that influencers play a huge part when it comes to a brand’s success. But how does influencer marketing work and how do we measure its success?

Influence by the Numbers: Understanding Influencer Marketing

Influencer marketing is highly relevant in today’s marketing standards. Influencers are the first ones who grab a product and do a review and make it viral. They control a considerable size of community and influence an even wider audience as well. Measuring their activity is possible but defining metrics for their influence is another story. In this article, we’ll delve deeper into the specifics.

What is an influencer?

An influencer is an individual on social media with a cult following based on loyalty and authority. Followers of an influencer tend to rely on the said influencer’s opinions and suggestions as a result.

Influence by the Numbers: Understanding Influencer Marketing

In short, an influencer is an individual on social media whose followers are based on trust and authority which can be utilised to gain a wider reach.

But the truth is, we’re just hitting the surface.

Everything comes down to context

Influencers are very different in terms of reach if we keep in mind the context. Doing Influencer outreach is important. First, you need to define your campaign goals and objectives which will set the context where you communicate. If your target group is a small niche, traditional influencer metrics like the number of followers won’t count as much as if you target a mass market community. So the first step is to define your context.

Active influencer is gold

It is important to know how active the Influencer is regardless of context. There are passive influencers who are not very active on social but followed by key community members. Also, there are others who do not make use of partnerships in marketing campaigns. You need to look for those who are happy to share their views online very often and also want to cooperate with others.

Measuring influence

Influence by the Numbers: Understanding Influencer Marketing

Measuring influencers need some careful preparation. Overall, there are some areas where you want to push your metrics, these are:

Context

The context of being an influencer is the first step to go. Where are they most active? What social media platforms do they frequent? You need to determine what and which to measure on. You also need to take a look at the community they have. What are the main topics? What is the tone of voice? Before reviewing a product or campaigning a brand, are there any talks beforehand?

Reach

Measuring reach can be tricky. Overall, once you have the context defined, you can determine how much reach you can gain through an influencer. If it’s a mass community, you can expect high figures but if you have a niche, expect loyal but lower visitors. Measuring reach is straightforward; you need to keep an eye on the number of followers and traffic that they generate.

Engagement

It comes down to authority and activity. If your influencers are active and have a bridge of trust with their community, expect higher engagements. Context can determine the type of engagements, but hands down shares are the most important as it makes your brand or content more viral.

Coherence

Coherence is a soft metric but looks for the topics the influencers share. Some influencers are active on different topics as they have a view on each. The narrower the content you have, the more coherent view you can get from the Influencer. If someone’s posting about laptop reviews only, expect to have a consistent tone of voice and a solid community. But if someone is a lifestyle blogger, expect a more diverse opinion on your brand after the campaign.

Influencer types

There are connectors, who actually recommend people or brands to people. They are suitable for generating sales leads, but don’t expect hands-down bright reviews.

There are the helpers, who solve issues for their communities and share the views. Expect to be tested by them and only engage with these type of influencers if you have a solid content or product.

And there are the sales people, who do a review and pitch sales to their followers. Expect a more solid sales pitch but the engagements might lag behind the previous two.

Overall, it is a great thing to reach out to influencers to get an evaluation or further boost in your product or service. But do the heavy work and prepare for anything. Preliminary strategic thinking is your friend in this. Don’t forget to add your KPIs before actually pushing your influencer campaign live.

Are you keen on tapping the power of influencer marketing?

Do you want to know more about it?

Book an on-demand Q&A session with us to discuss this further!